Sending & receiving calls and texts with iOS 8’s Continuity

Sending & receiving calls and texts with iOS 8’s Continuity

There’s been a bevy of new features that have come along with iOS 8 and the new version of OS X, Yosemite. One of the coolest (and handiest) is the ability to send and receive calls and texts from your iPhone on your Mac, reducing distractions and keeping all your communications on the same platform.

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Syncing files between devices with iCloud Drive

Syncing files between devices with iCloud Drive

With the release of iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite, Apple has launched a new service that they hope will eventually replace Dropbox completely: iCloud Drive.

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New iPads and iMacs at Apple’s October 16 Event

New iPads and iMacs at Apple’s October 16 Event

It’s rare that we get two Apple press events in the same month, but yesterday we got a second dose of good news with the announcement of a bevy of reworked gadgets.

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All About App-Specific Passwords in iCloud

All About App-Specific Passwords in iCloud

The press coverage on the recent leak of celebrity photos has continued to rage, with Jennifer Lawrence granting an interview to Vanity Fair and telling anyone who looked at the photos that they should “cower with shame.”

Avid Mac Tip readers will know that a few weeks ago we discussed two-step verification for iCloud in order to help keep your online account secure, and this week some users have been running into yet another helpful security feature.

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Share your iTunes purchases with your family & suffer no more Apple ID mayhem.

Share your iTunes purchases with your family & suffer no more Apple ID mayhem.

iOS 8 is now here, granting us a range of new and exciting features from QuickType to the Health app and more.

But the element that stands to help parents more than anything else is Family Sharing, a new tool for sharing purchases from an Apple ID. Read on as we cover what Family Sharing can do for you!

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ReStart Roundup: This Week in Apple News

ReStart Roundup: This Week in Apple News

It’s been a big week for Apple news online, from bent iPhones, to scary Shellshock viruses, to the death of the iPod Classic and more. Rather than share a Mac Tip this week we thought we’d do a little roundup for you with our thoughts on it all. Read on!

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Learn how to protect your iCloud account with Two-Step Verification!

Learn how to protect your iCloud account with Two-Step Verification!

If you’ve been following the news lately, you’ll have heard about this week’s big leak of celebrity photos and personal information. Apple has been taking some flak as people question the security of the iCloud service, but according to Apple it’s all to do with people not using the security options available to them. Reports say that the hackers got in by using a “brute force” program to try millions of passwords through the Find My iPhone service, which had a glitch that allowed unlimited password entry attempts. They may have also guessed or found out the answers to celebrities’ security questions, which you can use to reset your password.

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How to Buy the Right Printer: A ReStart Guide – August 8th 2014

How to Buy the Right Printer: A ReStart Guide – August 8th 2014

Buying a new printer can be pretty confusing. There are so many brands, options and versions that it can be hard to figure out which one suits your needs. At ReStart we stock only our favourite few choices to make it easier to decide, but even then there are several different models available. We stock Brother printers exclusively as in our experience they work the best with Mac OS X and iOS while providing a good balance of quality and value. Read on as we shed some light on the two models we regularly stock and help explain why each one might or might not be right for you.

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Coming in for a wireless landing! Understanding Apple’s Three AirPort Options – August 1st 2014

Coming in for a wireless landing! Understanding Apple’s Three AirPort Options – August 1st 2014

Using internet at home requires a combination of different cables and appliances. First, you need a modem, which decodes the information coming from your cable or ADSL connection and allows you to use it. And second, if you want to use your connection with multiple computers or devices, you’ll need a tool called a router.When most of us sign up for internet service here in Victoria, we get a wireless router built into our modem. These work fine for plugged-in use and do give out a fair wireless signal. However, many of our customers find their connection spotty or weak, and if you ever need to setup or configure them, it can be a real hassle involving special websites and arcane, complicated and poorly designed menus.For this reason we often recommend people look at Apple’s AirPort line of routers, of which there are three different models. Come along with us as we take a look. We’ll start with the smallest model in the lineup, the AirPort Express. This little guy is intended for use in small apartments or cabins, or as a range extender for a larger network — but it also has one cool feature that’s absent from the other devices. That little audio plug on the bottom right allows it to wirelessly stream music from any computer or iOS device to a set of speakers, making it an ideal addition for your home stereo system. It also features a USB port for connecting a printer to your network, and one Ethernet output for a direct connection to your computer. These cost $102.95+tax. Next we have the Express’ bigger brother, the Airport Extreme. This model’s got a lot more power, making it a good choice for your main router in a fair-sized home. If you find that you still have weak spots in your house, you can use Expresses to extend the range of this base station. It comes with three Ethernet ports for connecting multiple computers directly, and a USB port just like the Express. These are $199.95 w/ tax. Finally there is the Time Capsule, which from the outset looks exactly the same as an AirPort Extreme. This is for good reason as the Time Capsule features all the same guts as an Extreme, plus either a 2 TB or 3 TB hard drive! These are a great value as you get the $200 Extreme, plus a storage drive that would usually cost between $160-$180, for only $304.95 or $399.95 depending on the model. It’s also really nice having a convenient, cable-free backup solution for your MacBooks or iMacs in your home.As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Play DJ from far away with Apple’s Remote App! We show you how – July 25th 2014

Play DJ from far away with Apple’s Remote App! We show you how – July 25th 2014

More and more of us these days are moving away from the television as our main media source. For Americans ages 14-24, only 46% of their media comes from TV as opposed to 71% for Americans of other ages — and according to Nielsen, 44% of people who don’t own TVs are under 35.One of the ramifications of this is that many of us have a desktop or laptop as our main device at home, and that home theatres are becoming less popular. At ReStart, we’ve noticed more and more people coming in looking for nice, powerful bookshelf speakers for their computer desk so they can make their nightly Netflix watching a little more luxurious. But what happens when you have a party and want to bump some tunes? Enter Apple’s free iOS Remote app. This easy-to-use tool turns your iOS device, whether it be an iPhone, iPad or iPod, into one of the most powerful stereo remote controls you can imagine, giving you control over playlists and song selection. Not only does it make tuning your party’s mood a snap, but it’s also very useful for relaxing in an armchair with a book, or keeping the tunes rolling while you cook a gourmet dinner. Here’s how to do it. First, you’ll need to make sure both your Mac and iOS device are on the same wireless network. Next, you’ll need to download (if you don’t already have it) and launch the Remote app in your iOS device. To connect to the Mac, you can use either Home Sharing, which is nearly automatic when setup, or you can manually add a library. By default your iOS device will search for libraries using Home Sharing that are set up with the same Apple ID you have on your device.If you’re not using Home Sharing, tap the Settings button on your device, then hit “Add an iTunes Library”. The app walks you through the process; on your Mac, your device will show up in the sidebar with a small Remote logo next to it. You then enter the passcode on your device to link the two together. Once that’s done, go back to the main screen on your device and tap your library if needed. Now you can see a list of all the media option available, from your playlists to your artists to podcasts and more. Note that the volume control here only sets iTunes’ volume, not the overall volume of your Mac. You might find that it’s easier to turn your Mac up louder using the system volume, and then reduce iTunes volume to give you more control through Remote. As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Adding Your Email Account to Apple Mail – July 11th 2014

Adding Your Email Account to Apple Mail – July 11th 2014

Do you have a web-based email address, like Gmail, Hotmail, Telus or Shaw? Do you visit a website to look at your inbox? Ever wish you could see your messages when you’re not online, or that you could back up your messages to your desktop computer? Apple’s Mac OS X has a built-in tool for this which is simply called Mail. As an email client, it automatically gathers your messages from online servers, saves them on your computer and displays received messages to you whether you’re connected to the web or not. It’s also a great tool for sorting your emails and managing multiple accounts, and it often works much faster than refreshing pages in your browser. If you have an IMAP account, which most new ones are (you might remember these from this previous Mac Tip) you will still be able to see all the changes you’ve made online in case you’re ever away from your computer. If you’ve never used Apple Mail before, it will prompt you to add an account the first time you open it up, just like this: In this case we’ll choose a Gmail account. If you’ve got a Shaw account or another provider that’s not listed, you’ll need to select “Add Other Mail Account” before clicking Continue. If you’re following along with us, you’ll see this next: Go ahead and enter your full name, followed by your email address and password. For Gmail accounts, it’s really that simple! If you have a Shaw account however, you’ll need to follow the instructions listed at this Shaw support link, and have your Shaw email address and password ready.Adding other email accounts is similar, especially ones from a custom domain, like one under your business name (@restartcomputer.com, for example.) In that case you’ll need to talk to your network administrator to get the correct server settings for your email account; it may need custom ports or have a unique server address. Once that’s all good, it will take a few minutes for your messages to download and populate your mailboxes. If you want to watch it at work, open the Activity panel under the Window menu. After that, you’ll be good to go! Enjoy using Apple Mail. If you’re interested in learning more about how the client works, need help adding multiple accounts, or have any other questions, let us know — we can set up a one-on-one onsite with you, or if there is enough interest, a full monthly seminar. As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Best Of Mac Tips Pt. 2 – June 27th 2014

We had a great time digging through the archives last week, so here’s another edition of The Best of Mac Tips. Hope you enjoy this look back over the past couple years, whether it’s all new to you or a familiar look back. For the rest of the Mac Tips Archive, check out our website: The Mac Tips ArchiveAnything jump out to you? Want more info on one of these topics, or a whole Mac Tip devoted to something new of your choice? Just hit reply – we love hearing from you.  Fast & easy ways to Google more effectively Google is the most powerful search engine available. Learn how to harness its full potential with the handy tips in this Mac Tip.What to do if your Mac or iPhone gets wet Water or any other liquid splashing into your computer or surrounding your phone is one of the scariest things we can imagine. Here’s what to do if it happens to you. Free up some storage space on your Mac! We share some tips on how to keep a clean and healthy hard drive by deleting old files and folders you don’t need. The first step before a new HD upgrade. Drag your email into the 21st century Learn the difference between POP accounts like Shaw & IMAP accounts like Gmail in this informative Mac Tip that explains the different email protocols. Backing up iOS with iCloud Figure out how to back up your iPhone or iPad to iCloud and avoid common pesky errors like “your backup is almost full.” It’s a snap! Or at least, it should be.As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Best Of Mac Tips – June 20th 2014

Welcome to the 75th issue of Mac Tips! It was a drab autumn afternoon the first time we emailed you all a fresh Mac Tip of the week. Can you believe it’s now been a year and a half since we started? Thank you so much to everyone who has stayed on or newly subscribed throughout our time together. We’re excited to announce that we’ve launched an archive of our previous Mac Tips on our website right here at The Mac Tips Archive. Check it out for back issues of all our 75 emails dating back to 2012! In honour of this occasion we’ve pulled together some of our favourite and most useful Mac Tips from the past 18 months to share with all of you. Whether you missed these on the first pass or are simply getting a refresher we hope it’ll be a fun ride. Onwards!Signing Documents With Preview Last March, Apple’s built-in document reader and image viewer Preview came out with a great new feature that allowed you to sign documents digitally. It’s still awesome. Setting Up a Bluetooth Device Wireless speakers! Keyboards with no cables! Learn how to sync Bluetooth devices to your Mac or iOS device in this Mac Tip from early last year. Using CDs & DVDs w/ MacBook Air and Retina Have a newer Mac without a CD/DVD drive? Get the scoop on how to share them from Mac to Mac using the Remote Disc feature in this Mac Tip. Quick & Easy WiFi Setup on Macs and iOS  We show you how to set up a WiFi network using one of Apple’s AirPort routers in this Mac tip from 2013. It’s a snap using either your Mac or a handy iOS device! Sharing Files Between Computers with Dropbox  The new OS X Yosemite is arriving this fall with a relaunched iCloud storage feature that aims to replace Dropbox’s handy syncing system. In the meantime, this tip’ll help. That’s all the time we have this week, but stay tuned next week for more of our favourite gems from the Mac Tips back catalog, and be sure to check out our new calendar for seminar registration as well! restartcomputer.com/training/ As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Accessories for your Mac – Mac Tip June 13th 2014

Accessories for your Mac – Mac Tip June 13th 2014

Buying a Mac should be a fun and easy process, and at ReStart we do our best to make sure that it’s a hassle-free and worry-free experience.Part of that commitment to customer service is making sure that all of our customers have the info they need on what accessories and peripherals go with your computer and why you might want to invest in them. If you’re thinking about buying a new Mac, or you already have one and are curious what else you might need, read on! One of the first things we always recommend to our customers is a backup hard drive, like this one from LaCie, a well-known French manufacturer: Having an external hard drive like this lets you use your Mac’s built-in backup program, Time Machine, so ensure you have a second copy of all of your important files. Family photos, music, home videos, everything important to you will be backed up securely.These drives range from a little over $100 for a personal laptop drive to $400 for large professional storage tools. We’d be happy to show you how to set it up, no problem. If you’re carting around a new (or used!) notebook, you may want to consider a bag or sleeve such as this Neoprene Pro Sleeve from Incase: A simple but elegant sleeve like this will help protect the finish of your notebook as well as its internal components from drop damage and bumps. Cases like these are ideal for putting inside larger bags and work well for both students and professionals. We also have a range of decorated and artistic cases if you feel like branching out.The third accessory we like to recommend is a copy of Microsoft Office. While Apple provides a great office suite in the form of Pages, Numbers and Keynote, most people are very comfortable in the Microsoft environment. Office comes in both the Home & Student Edition and the Home & Business edition, which features the powerful email client Outlook. If you have a MacBook Air or a MacBook Pro with Retina display, copies of this software are available for easy download from the Microsoft website; simply purchase a license key from us and activate it once the app has finished downloading.We hope that helps you with your next buying decision! As always, if you have any questions, concerns, comments or suggestions for future newsletters, please hit reply and let us know. Thank you for reading Mac...

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Which MacBook is right for you? – Mac Tip May 30th 2014

Since the introduction of the Intel core Macs in 2006, Apple has constantly been refining and updating its lineup of notebooks. We had the original 13″ plastic MacBook, the aluminum MacBook Pro 15″ and 17″, then the unibody models and so on. The current series features three different models, each with their own pluses and minuses. Today we’ll be looking at all three and helping you decide which model is best for you. 13″ MacBook Pro To start, let’s talk about the 13″ MacBook Pro. This is not the cheapest model in the lineup, but it has the oldest design and is one of the most popular machines we sell here at ReStart. Starting at a cost of $1,199, this MacBook Pro is the last design to come with moving parts: a spinning-disc hard drive and a rewriteable CD/DVD Superdrive. It also features Firewire 800 and a built-in Ethernet port, both of which are missing from the smaller sides of the new retina display MacBooks. Because of the larger body and more easily breakable parts, this series of MacBook Pro is quite easy to upgrade or repair throughout its life. If you are limited in budget or you believe you may want additional RAM or storage in the future, this is a great option. It is significantly heavier than its solid-state-drive powered compatriots at about 4.5lb, but the 13″ size keeps it manageable. MacBook Pro with Retina display (13″ & 15″) Next we have the new generation of MacBook Pro, which features a high-resolution retina display. These are the most advanced models in the lineup and your only option if you want a larger 15″ screen. The MacBook Pro with Retina display is notably thinner and lighter than the standard MacBook Pro, with the 13″ weighing only around 3.5lb and the 15″ coming in at 4.5lb. In order to fit all the components into this smaller shell, the retina display models do not include a CD/DVD drive or hard disk drive and come equipped with a solid-state drive for superfast startup, shutdown, and file access. They also have upgraded processors and video cards for things like better video, photo and audio editing. The retina models also come with a built-in HDMI port, USB 3.0 connectivity, and two Thunderbolt ports for external hard drives and monitors. It’s important to note that if you’ve used a spinning-disc HDD before, you may find that the retina display models have smaller drives than you are used to. Make sure you check the capacity of your current drive before planning to do a data transfer. MacBook Air (11″ & 13″) Finally, there is the MacBook Air. Introduced in 2008 as Apple’s first ultraportable, the Air is designed to be as light and small as possible while still coming with a full-size keyboard and display. The internal components are similar to the retina display models but at a less expensive price point, meaning less powerful graphics cards and older-generation processors. The Air is the only MacBook available in 11″ as well as 13″, making it the least expensive Apple notebook (at a price of $999.95) as well as the lightest, weighing only 3lb. If you are looking for a computer for traveling, business trips, etc. with the smallest footprint, the MacBook Air is the ideal solution. Again, however, the storage capacity of...

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